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Monday, August 22, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Valiant Ambition


 It's Monday, What are You Reading?
Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the fate of the American Revolution
by Nathaniel Philbrick


https://www.amazon.com/Valiant-Ambition-Washington-Benedict-Revolution-ebook/dp/B0141ZP36A/


This post is the one-hundred and fifteenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


I’ve had this one on my iPad Mini Kindle App for some time and have read on it from time to time. Lately, I’ve been spending more time on it. It is an interesting contrast to the 'First Entrepreneur' I’m still working on for bedtime reading. Washington story is just a couple of years apart, but seen from very different perspectives. Of course, in this one, George and Benedict are treating their ‘ambition’ in quite different ways…  ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

"Valiant Ambition may be one of the greatest what-if books of the age—a volume that turns one of America’s best-known narratives on its head.”
—Boston Globe [My observation - incorrect to refer to this as a 'what-if' book - not at all!]

"Clear and insightful, it consolidates his reputation as one of America's foremost practitioners of narrative nonfiction."
—Wall Street Journal

From the New York Times bestselling author of In The Heart of the Sea and Mayflower comes a surprising account of the middle years of the American Revolution, and the tragic relationship between George Washington and Benedict Arnold.

In September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within.
            Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of Washington and Arnold, who is an impulsive but sympathetic hero whose misfortunes at the hands of self-serving politicians fatally destroy his faith in the legitimacy of the rebellion. As a country wary of tyrants suddenly must figure out how it should be led, Washington’s unmatched ability to rise above the petty politics of his time enables him to win the war that really matters.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 18, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? First Entrepreneur


 It's Monday, What are You Reading?
First Entrepreneur: 
How George Washington Built His - and the Nation’s - Prosperity
by Edward G. Lengel



This post is the one-hundred and fourteenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


This is the second of the two books on my Wish List that Nancy got me for my birthday, from Amazon…this one in Print Edition. Should be a fun read! ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

George Washington was not only “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen”—he was also America’s most important entrepreneur.

Editorial Reviews from Amazon:

Praise for First Entrepreneur

"First Entrepreneur is an almost magical book. It deftly tells the little known story of George Washington’s life as a man of business and simultaneously convinces us that his vision of a commercial nation creating a community of interests between all parts of America was (and still is) the key to our survival as a nation. Edward Lengel has added a new dimension to Washington’s greatness."—Thomas Fleming, author of The Great Divide

"Edward Lengel, who knows George Washington inside and out, has authored a thoughtful, carefully researched, and gracefully written account of the founder as a businessman. Mention Washington and the picture that comes to mind is that of a soldier and statesman. But, as Lengel demonstrates, Washington was a bold, risk-taking, innovative, calculating, and, above all, successful investor and entrepreneur. Lengel shows how Washington brought his business and managerial skills to his roles as commander of the Continental Army and the presidency and how they helped him succeed in those capacities. This is an excellent and illuminating book that deserves to be read."—John Ferling, author of Whirlwind: The American Revolution and the War That Won It

"In this original, lucid, and accessible study, Edward Lengel deploys his mastery of George Washington's vast correspondence to reveal a surprising yet highly significant side to his character. He shows how the energy, realism, and willingness to innovate that typified Washington's approach to his own business ventures was transferred, with momentous consequences, when he led America in war and peace. First Entrepreneur provides a fascinating portrait of an inveterate micro-manager whose hands-on experience taught him that commerce was the strongest cement for bonding the newly United States."—Stephen Brumwell, author of George Washington: Gentleman Warrior

Kirkus Reviews, 12/15/15
"[Lengel] organically traces the evolution of Washington's free market thinking through his first and second presidential terms: building a national economy, encouraging domestic manufacturing, establishing a central bank, and developing a sense of unity of purpose. A deeply researched and nicely handled biography."


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 11, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The First Congress


It's Monday, What are You Reading?
The First Congress: 
How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government 
by Fergus M. Bordewich


This post is the one-hundred and thirteenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This is one of two books on my Wish List that Nancy got me for my birthday, from Amazon…this one in Kindle Edition, which I read on my iPad Mini. Therefore, I read this book in bits and pieces between other reading of news articles from many sources, Facebook, and my two games. I’m only a couple of chapters in but am already seeing that the arguments on the floor of Congress in those first few days of trying to create a government out of the approved Constitution are over many of the same issues and the same approaches now, as then. Oh, my! ;-) I am really not surprised, of course. Different folks see the same issues differently, depending on their individual viewpoints and agendas. That has not changed, and will not change, in a democratic republic - long may it live!!! ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

The little known story of perhaps the most productive Congress in US history, the First Federal Congress of 1789–1791.

The First Congress was the most important in US history, says prizewinning author and historian Fergus Bordewich, because it established how our government would actually function. Had it failed—as many at the time feared it would—it’s possible that the United States as we know it would not exist today.

The Constitution was a broad set of principles. It was left to the members of the First Congress and President George Washington to create the machinery that would make the government work. Fortunately, James Madison, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and others less well known today, rose to the occasion. During two years of often fierce political struggle, they passed the first ten amendments to the Constitution; they resolved bitter regional rivalries to choose the site of the new national capital; they set in place the procedure for admitting new states to the union; and much more. But the First Congress also confronted some issues that remain to this day: the conflict between states’ rights and the powers of national government; the proper balance between legislative and executive power; the respective roles of the federal and state judiciaries; and funding the central government. Other issues, such as slavery, would fester for decades before being resolved.

The First Congress tells the dramatic story of the two remarkable years when Washington, Madison, and their dedicated colleagues struggled to successfully create our government, an achievement that has lasted to the present day.
Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 4, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Five Presidents


It's Monday, What are You Reading? Five Presidents: 
My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford
by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin


This post is the one-hundred and twelveth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This fine book was a recent gift from my daughter, Allison. I’m really looking forward to a view of these five presidencies from this perspective.


Book Description from Amazon:

A rare and fascinating portrait of the American presidency from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Kennedy and Me and Five Days in November.

Secret Service agent Clint Hill brings history intimately and vividly to life as he reflects on his seventeen years protecting the most powerful office in the nation. Hill walked alongside Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, and Gerald R. Ford, seeing them through a long, tumultuous era—the Cold War; the Cuban Missile Crisis; the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy; the Vietnam War; Watergate; and the resignations of Spiro Agnew and Richard M. Nixon.

Some of his stunning, never-before-revealed anecdotes include:
-Eisenhower’s reaction at Russian Prime Minister Khrushchev’s refusal to talk following the U-2 incident
-The torture of watching himself in the Zapruder film in a Secret Service training
-Johnson’s virtual imprisonment in the White House during violent anti-Vietnam protests
-His decision to place White House files under protection after a midnight phone call about Watergate
-The challenges of protecting Ford after he pardoned Nixon

With a unique insider’s perspective, Hill sheds new light on the character and personality of these five presidents, revealing their humanity in the face of grave decisions.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, June 27, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Revolution: Mapping the Road to American Independence

It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
Revolution: 
Mapping the Road to American Independence 1755-1783
by Richard H. Brown and Paul E. Cohen


This post is the one-hundred and eleventh entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This fine book was a recent gift from my daughter, Annette. It is a excellent reference but also an interesting read. Many of the maps were made by British engineers during their ‘occupation’ of America during this period - a different point of view; always of value.



Book Description from Amazon:

The spectacular legacy and importance of early American cartographers.
Historians of the Revolutionary War in America have been fortunate in their resources: few wars in history have such a rich literary and cartographic heritage. The high skills of the surveyors, artists, and engravers who delineated the topography and fields of battle allow us to observe the unfolding of events that ultimately defined the United States.
When warfare erupted between Britain and her colonists in 1775, maps provided graphic news about military matters. A number of the best examples are reproduced here, including some from the personal collections of King George III, the Duke of Northumberland, and the Marquis de Lafayette. Other maps from institutional and private collections are being published for the first time. In all, sixty significant and beautiful cartographic works from 1755 to 1783 illustrate this intriguing era.
Most books about the Revolution begin with Lexington and Concord and progress to the British surrender at Yorktown, but in this rich collection the authors lay the groundwork for the war by also taking into account key events of the antecedent conflict. The seeds of revolution were planted during the French and Indian War (1755–1763), and it was then that a good number of the participants, both British and rebel, cut their teeth. George Washington took his first command during this war, alongside the future British commanding General Thomas Gage.
At the Treaty of Paris, the French and Indian War ended, and King George III gained clear title to more territory than had ever been exchanged in any other war before or since. The British military employed its best-trained artists and engineers to map the richest prize in its Empire. They would need those maps for the fratricidal war that would begin twelve years later. Their maps and many others make up the contents of this fascinating and beautiful book.
60 maps



Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, June 20, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Montana Women Homesteaders


Montana Women Homesteaders: 
A Field of One’s Own 
Edited by Sarah Carter
 


This post is the one-hundred and tenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This has been sitting on my wife’s book shelf for several years. She handed it to me when she heard me say I was enjoying the Colorado Women Climbers book. Guess it is time to check it out! ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

In Montana Women Homesteaders: A Field of One's Own, author and historian Sarah Carter introduces the voices and images of women who filed on 160- or 320-acre homestead plots in Montana.
Single, widowed, divorced, or deserted, women varied in ages, educational levels, and ethnic backgrounds, but all proved up on their homesteads.
In published accounts, scrapbooks, personal reminiscences, and photographs, the women recorded their remarkable journeys.
Carter reveals inspiring stories filled with joy, tragedy, and redemption. 
Silver medal, WILLA Literary Awards, scholarly nonfiction, 2010
For more information, visit FarcountryPress.com.



Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, June 6, 2016

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Magnificent Mountain Women


It's Monday, What are You Reading?
The Magnificent Mountain Women:
Adventures in the Colorado Rockies
by Janet Robertson
 
This post is the one-hundred and ninth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]
 

http://www.amazon.com/Magnificent-Mountain-Women-Janet-Robertson/dp/B000GQWHKY/ (1990 edition)(I read)

http://www.amazon.com/Magnificent-Mountain-Women-Second-Adventures/dp/0803289952/ (2003 2nd Edition)



This has been sitting on my shelf for years, picked up in Colorado at the bookstore one year.
Good read… shouldn’t have waited so long!! ;-)



Book Description from Amazon:

1st Edition:
Adventures in the Colorado Rockies. Lively well illustrated book on women climbers, skiers, hikers, guides, doctors, etc. in the 54 Colorado peaks.

2nd Edition:
Since the Pikes Peak gold rush in the mid–nineteenth century, women have gone into the mountains of Colorado to hike, climb, ski, homestead, botanize, act as guides, practice medicine, and meet a variety of other challenges, whether for sport or for livelihood. Janet Robertson recounts their exploits in a lively, well-illustrated book that measures up to its title, The Magnificent Mountain Women. Arlene Blum provides a new introduction to this edition.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)